WE WILL REMEMBER THEM…

Iraq:

Ibrahim al-Yussuf (age 12); Jalal al-Yussuf (age 17); Hashim Kamel Radi (age 22); Fateha Ghazzi (age 8); Nada Abdallah (age 16); Khowla Abdel-Fattah (age 70); Faris El Baur (age 11); Saif El Baur (age 11); Marwa Abbas (age 11);  Tabarek Abbas (age 8); Safia Abbas (age 5); Qassem Moussa (age 42); Thamer Abdel-Wahid (age 27); Nujah Abdel-Ridda (age 27); Arkan Daif (age 14); Walid Abu Shaker (age 23); Samar Hussein (age 13); Mohammad Ahmed (age 4); Nadia Kalaf (age 33); Zeena Akram Hamoodi (age 12); Mustafa Akram Hamoodi (age 13); Zain El Abideen Akram Hammodi (age 18); Zainab Akram Hamoody Hamoodi (age 19); Hassan Iyad Hamoodi (age 10); Ammar Muhammad Hamoodi (age 1); Wissam Abed Hamoodi (age 40); Dr. Ihab Abed (age 34); Duaa Raheem (age 6); Sa’la al-Mousai (age 55); Alaa-eddin Khazal (age 42); Wadhar Handi (age 34); Bashir Handi (age 28); Safa Karim (age 11)

Sena Hassad (age 36); Rana Hassad (age 10); Maria Hassad (age 7); Sama Sami (age 30) and daughters Lana, Miriam and Lava; Salma Amin (age 50) and sons Mohammed (age 27), Said (age 24), and daughter Shams (age 20); Hanna Fatah (age 70); Noor Sabah (age 12); Abdul Khader (age 5); Hamsa Mohammed Omar (age 6); Hamsa Mohammed Omar (age 12); Ali Ramzi (age 10); Abu Salam Abdul Gafir (age 16); Rowand Mohammed Suleiman (age 8 months); Haithem Tamini (age 7); Nora Tamini (age 9); Arkan David Belu (age 28); Muhammed al-Barheini (age 25); Dana Ali (age 8); Lamiya Ali (age 6); Abdullah Abdul-Majeed al-Sa’doon (age 26); Salman Abu al-Heel (age 25); Waleed Saleh Abdel-Latif (age 32); Tuamer Abdel Hamid (age 47); Hussein Rashid (age 18); Ali Salim (age 14); Ahmed al Rifaai (age 13)

Afghanistan:

Muhammad Makai (age 22); Bilal Gulam Rasul (age 4); Kaled Gulam Rasul (age 6); Wares Gulam Rasul (age 12); Samin Gulam Rasul (age 9); Sukuria Rasul (age 30); Said Mir-Said Jan (age 55); Said Mir-Said Mir (age 26); Nazira-Said Mir (age 21); Sofi Kasim (age 39); Aziza-Khuja Fagir (age 23); Sima Ahmad (age 35), his wife Gul Ahmad (age 40), and their children Sidiqqa Gul Ahmad (age 18), Shokria Gul Ahmad (age 16), Razia Gul Ahmad (age 10), Zakera Gul Ahmad (age 8), Fahima Gul Ahmad (age 5), Ramazan Gul Ahmad (age 12); Mira Jan (age 14); Lal Muhammad (age 35); Shar Maliki (age 75)

A further commemorative list of the names of around 5,000 Iraqi civilians can be found here, and the names of 3,767 Afghan civilians here. These names constitute a small fraction of the more than 600,000 civilians killed in our wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

WE MUST NEVER FORGET THESE FELLOW HUMANS KILLED IN OUR NAME. THEY TOO MUST BE REMEMBERED TOGETHER WITH THE NAMES OF ALL OUR FALLEN SERVICE PERSONNEL. WE ARE ALL FELLOW HUMAN BEINGS ON THIS EARTH; WE ARE ALL UNITED IN DEATH.

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About richardjacksonterrorismblog

I am currently the Deputy Director of the National Peace and Conflict Studies Centre at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Prior to this, I was Professor of International Politics at Aberystwyth University in Wales, UK. I study and teach on issues of terrorism, political violence, conflict resolution and war. I have published several books on these topics, including: Terrorism: A Critical Introduction (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011; co-authored with Lee Jarvis, Jeroen Gunning and Marie Breen Smyth); Contemporary State Terrorism: Theory and Cases (Abingdon: Routledge, 2010; edited by Richard Jackson, Eamon Murphy and Scott Poynting); Critical Terrorism Studies: A New Research Agenda (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009; edited by Richard Jackson, Marie Breen Smyth and Jeroen Gunning); Conflict Resolution in the Twenty-first Century: Principles, Methods and Approaches (Ann Arbor MI: Michigan University Press, 2009; co-authored with Jacob Bercovitch); and Writing the War on Terrorism: Language, Politics and Counterterrorism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005). I am also the editor-in-chief of the academic journal, Critical Studies on Terrorism.
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5 Responses to WE WILL REMEMBER THEM…

  1. Lewis says:

    At 11am, on the 11th Day of the 11th Month, we paused in silence, as we rightly should, to remember those tragically killed in the armed conflicts that have, and continue, to plague mankind…But going forward I don’t want to be silent, I don’t to keep quiet. Almost everyday we hear breaking news of another young British soldier getting blown up by an IED or shot dead in Helmand Province, Kandahar or Laskar Gah. The war in Afghanistan has gone on for 10 long years. Over 350 of our friends, neighbours and relatives have lost their lives, not to mention the unknown number with life changing injuries. And for what? To stop terrorism? Britain suffered its worst ever terrorist attack a few years after the war in Afghanistan started. It was a suicide mission carried out by a ‘bunch of guys’ raised and living on a council estate in Yorkshire. It had nothing to do with bin laden or long bearded men living thousands of miles away in Kabul. The greatest terrorist threat to Britain right now is domestic, not foreign… Is our war in Afghanistan designed to give Afghans a better way of life through democracy building? To what extent have the lives of ordinary Afghanis really improved over the last 10 years? Estimates of Afghans killed in the last 10 years is 10,000, and thats the absolute minimum estimate. Outside of symmetric conflict, legitimate, stable regime change cannot be imposed by men with guns, it must come from within. The Arab Spring tells us this…If it is time to remember anything today, it is time to remember that our Armed Forces are here to defend our nation from foreign aggression. They should not be so wilfully exploited by Politicians in London to effect regime change that furthers the economic or geopolitical interests of the West.

  2. Pingback: Red poppies and Leagues of Nations (ii) | The American Exception

  3. insurrectblog says:

    ‘We are all united in death’

    One academic among many is willing to stand up to the ‘conventional thing to do’,

  4. A.R. says:

    According to the UN, upwards of 75% of the civilian casualties in Afghanistan have been caused by Taliban and other insurgent groups. The real number is likely to be even higher, since great many of the civilian casualties attributed to the Afghan and international forces have in fact not been civilians at all. While we must remember the victims of the war, we should also remember who it is that is deliberately and indiscriminately targeting civilians. Here is a hint: It is not the international forces.

    The quality of life of ordinary Afghans has improved immensely over the last 10 years. In areas no longer ruled by the Taliban or other reactionary groups, that is. The Afghans in many of those liberated areas now enjoy such basic ingredients of dignified life as freedom from tyranny and arbitrary killings and corporal punishments. They are now free to play sports, listen to music and – God forbid – sing and dance. That is, they get to generally enjoy living like they never could under the Taliban regime. Women and girls get to go to school, learn to read and have access to health care and women’s clinics that, while still appalling poor, is something they never had under the Taliban rule. Infant and maternal mortality has decreased to a fraction of what it was as late as 2001. All this means that the average Afghan, living in the relative security of the non-Taliban-controlled areas, enjoys a better quality of life even in circumstance of war than they ever did during the ‘peace’ of the Taliban era. To them a continuing war is a better alternative than peace if it means the return of the Taliban rule. And that is why the war will not end even if we leave.

    The war in Afghanistan is not in the vital security interests of Britain or any other European country. But it is absolutely vital to the freedom and human dignity of the ordinary Afghans, especially the Afghan women. If the international forces leave Afghanistan now, it will be a disaster to the ordinary Afghan civilians. A disaster much greater than the war itself has ever been.

  5. Mark says:

    At 11am, on the 11th Day of the 11th Month, we paused in silence, as we rightly should, to remember those tragically killed in the armed conflicts that have, and continue, to plague mankind…But going forward I don’t want to be silent, I don’t to keep quiet. Almost everyday we hear breaking news of another young British soldier getting blown up by an IED or shot dead in Helmand Province, Kandahar or Laskar Gah. The war in Afghanistan has gone on for 10 long years. Over 350 of our friends, neighbours and relatives have lost their lives, not to mention the unknown number with life changing injuries. And for what? To stop terrorism? Britain suffered its worst ever terrorist attack a few years after the war in Afghanistan started. It was a suicide mission carried out by a ‘bunch of guys’ raised and living on a council estate in Yorkshire. It had nothing to do with bin laden or long bearded men living thousands of miles away in Kabul. The greatest terrorist threat to Britain right now is domestic, not foreign… Is our war in Afghanistan designed to give Afghans a better way of life through democracy building? To what extent have the lives of ordinary Afghanis really improved over the last 10 years? Estimates of Afghans killed in the last 10 years is 10,000, and thats the absolute minimum estimate. Outside of symmetric conflict, legitimate, stable regime change cannot be imposed by men with guns, it must come from within. The Arab Spring tells us this…If it is time to remember anything today, it is time to remember that our Armed Forces are here to defend our nation from foreign aggression. They should not be so wilfully exploited by Politicians in London to effect regime change that furthers the economic or geopolitical interests of the West.
    +1

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